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Name / Constellation

M 37

Other:NGC 2099, Cr 75, Mel 38, Lund 115, h 369, GC 1295

Aur

Coordinates AR: 05h 52m 18.3s - Dec: +32° 33′ 11″
Optics Takahashi FSQ 106N APO Fluorite F5 - 60/220 guiding refractor
Camera-Mount SBIG STF8300M - Orion StarShot Guider - 10Micron GM2000 QCI Mount
Filters Baader RGB
Exposure
  • Red
  • Green
  • Blue
  • 10 x 180 sec - 30 min
  • 1 0x 180 sec - 30 min
  • 10 x 180 sec - 30 min
  • BINNING 2X2
  • BINNING 2X2
  • BINNING 2X2
Location / Date Promiod (Valle D'Aosta-Italy) "TLP" Remote Observatory - 20 feb 2018
Seeing About 3.8 " @ 2.1 arcosec/pixel unbinned
Note  
Acquisition MaxIm DL - CCD Autopilot 5
Processing Adobe Photoshop CS5 -
Comment

Messier 37 (also known as M37 or NGC 2099) is the richest open cluster in the constellation Auriga. It is the brightest of three open clusters in Auriga and was discovered by the Italian astronomer Giovanni Battista Hodierna before 1654. M37 was missed by French astronomer Guillaume Le Gentil when he rediscovered M36 and M38 in 1749. French astronomer Charles Messier independently rediscovered M37 in September 1764. M37 is located in the antipodal direction, opposite from the Galactic Center as seen from Earth.[4] Estimates of its age range from 347[1] million to 550[3] million years. It has 1,500[2] times the mass of the Sun and contains over 500 identified stars,[3] with roughly 150 stars brighter than magnitude 12.5. At its estimated distance of around 4,500 light-years (1,400 parsecs)[1] from Earth, the cluster's angular diameter of 24 arcminutes corresponds to a physical extent of about 20–25 ly (6.1–7.7 pc).