Click on the image for FULL RES

Name / Constellation

M 13

Other: NGC6205, Her Great Globular

Her

Coordinates AR: 16h 41m 41.44s - Dec: +36° 27′ 36.9″
Optics Takahashi FSQ 106N APO Fluorite F5 - 60/220 guiding refractor
Camera-Mount SBIG STF8300M - Orion StarShot Guider - 10Micron GM2000 QCI Mount
Filters Baader RGB
Exposure
  • Red
  • Green
  • Blue
  • 12 x 300 sec - 1 hour
  • 12 x 300 sec - 1 hour
  • 12 x 300 sec - 1 hour
  • BINNING 2X2
  • BINNING 2X2
  • BINNING 2X2
Location / Date Promiod (Valle D'Aosta-Italy) "TLP" Remote Observatory - 21 apr 2018
Seeing About 3.8 " @ 2.1 arcosec/pixel unbinned
Note Bad seeing
Acquisition MaxIm DL - CCD Autopilot 5
Processing Adobe Photoshop CS6 -
Comment

Messier 13 (M13), also designated NGC 6205 and sometimes called the Great Globular Cluster in Hercules or the Hercules Globular Cluster, is a globular cluster of about 300,000 stars in the constellation of Hercules. M13 was discovered by Edmond Halley in 1714, and cataloged by Charles Messier on June 1, 1764. Charles had a list of more than a 100 objects that later became known as the Messier Catalog. The French astronomer mistook these objects for comets, but compiled them into a list to help future scientists. Nearby is NGC 6207, a 12th magnitude edge-on galaxy that lies 28 arc minutes directly north east. A small galaxy, IC 4617, lies halfway between NGC 6207 and M13, north-northeast of the large globular cluster's center. M13 is about 145 light-years in diameter, and it is composed of several hundred thousand stars, the brightest of which is a red giant, the variable star V11, with an apparent visual magnitude of 11.95. M13 is 22,200 light-years away from Earth. The Arecibo message of 1974, which contained encoded information about the human race, DNA, atomic numbers, Earth's position and other information, was beamed from the Arecibo Observatory radio telescope towards M13 as an experiment in contacting potential extraterrestrial civilizations in the cluster. While the cluster will move through space during the transit time, the proper motion is small enough that the cluster will only move 24 light years, only a fraction of the diameter of the cluster. Thus, the message will still arrive near the center of the cluster