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Name / Constellation

M 100

Other: NGC 4321, UGC 7450, PGC 40153, CGCG 99-30

Com

Coordinates AR: 12h 22m 54.9s - Dec: +15° 49′ 21″
Optics Richtey-Chretien Officina Stellare 10"@F8 Carbon Truss
Camera-Mount SBIG ST10XME/CFW10/ONAG/ST8300 guider - 10Micron GM2000 QCI Mount
Filters Astrodon LRGB TruBalance (Gen 2)
Exposure
  • Luminance
  • Red
  • Green
  • Blue
  • 10 x 900 sec - 2 hours 30 min
  • 6 x 600 sec - 60 minutes
  • 6 x 600 sec - 60 minutes
  • 6 x 600 sec - 60 minutes
  • UNBINNED
  • BINNING 2X2
  • BINNING 2X2
  • BINNING 2X2
Location / Date Promiod (Valle D'Aosta-Italy) "TLP" Remote Observatory - 14 feb 2019
Seeing About 2.8 " @ 0.71 arcosec/pixel image scale unbinned
Note Not good seeing
Acquisition MaxIm DL - CCD Autopilot 5
Processing Adobe Photoshop CS5 -
Comment

Messier 100 (also known as NGC 4321) is an example of a grand design[4] intermediate spiral galaxy located within the southern part of constellation Coma Berenices. It is one of the brightest and largest galaxies in the Virgo Cluster, located approximately 55 million light-years distant from Earth and has a diameter of 107,000 light years, roughly 60% the size of the Milky Way. It was discovered by Pierre Méchain on March 15, 1781 and was subsequently entered in Messier's catalogue of nebulae and star clusters after Charles Messier made observations of his own on April 13, 1781. The galaxy was one of the first spiral galaxies to be discovered, and was listed as one of fourteen spiral nebulae by Lord William Parsons of Rosse in 1850. Two satellite galaxies named NGC 4323--connected with M100 by a bridge of luminous matter--and NGC 4328 surround M100.